Fictional Misconceptions

4 thoughts on “Fictional Misconceptions”

  1. Greetings from India. It’s not every morning one wakes to find someone has found my work of use, let alone that I’ve ‘blessed the internet’ with it. What a happy thought! Reading accounts like yours makes sharing worthwhile – many thanks.

    I needn’t tell you that what you’ve tried to do in your post is extremely difficult – you’ll be only too aware of the counter-examples that threaten the legitimacy of defining characteristics, as I was when I wrote my thesis and tried to define literary minimalism. Yet, it’s a process worth doing, especially when teaching demands some firm answers (or at least starting points) when thinking about the differences between genres. I sense that your work here will be invaluable to your students and to those who read it and teach, too.

    Best to you

    Phil Greaney
    New Delhi, India

    1. Hey! What a great honor to have your reply. Yes, I absolutely expect that there will be dissent, and I have to tell you it takes some courage to be public about such assertions especially as a teacher. I teach undergraduates and helping them develop even a basic discernment involved in the different forms will, I think, be a good starting point for their future explorations. I don’t know whether your full thesis is published yet or not, but I know I’ll want to read a copy soon.

      1. If you can get me your email – I’d rather not publish mine here – I will send you an electronic copy of my thesis. Unless you have a better idea, I’m @philgreaney on Twitter; a DM will keep the spambots away.

      2. Hi Phil. Sorry: for some reason I was sure I had replied to this but apparently did not. I’d love to get an electronic copy of your thesis. You can send it to my email at lvaleri@ georgiasouthern.edu. Thank you again.

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